Classic Cars That Run

Did you know that you can buy a classic car which is actually electric? It’s true, it turns out that Henry Ford and Edison had worked together to design and engineer an electric car with nickel-iron batteries (400+ pounds worth of batteries) on a car that was a little bit over 1,100 pounds, and get this, the darn thing could go for 100 miles without recharging. Basically you could have a Model T era classic car that is electric, a car built in 1911 – and it only cost $600. That was over 100-years ago, so, yes, it would be considered a classic in that case right? Okay so, let’s talk about automobile history for a moment shall we?

So, what happened to the Electric Car? Why are we driving internal combustion engine cars rather than electric vehicles today? Well, a couple of reasons really, the biggest is probably due to the reality that there is a lot of energy in fossil fuels, and the other has to do with competition of industrial capitalists back in that day.

You might like to read; “Internal Combustion,” by Edwin Black. I also recommend reading an old article from the New York Times on September 15, 1912 “The Power of Darkness Have Suffered Another Rout,” which talks about the electric cars of that period and exactly what Edison and Ford had planned back then. Interestingly enough, I noted a 1954 Ford electric car at Don Laughlin’s auto museum in Laughlin, NV during my visit there, so there are people who own classic electric cars.

For those interested in classic cars and the history of the electric car, I’d like to recommend a great series available online. It is quite interesting indeed. You can look up this YouTube Video series from Stanford University titled “Cars: Past, Present, Future,” put on by the Revs Program about how cars and humans have over time become intimately involved. Yes, our love of cars in America and we certainly love the historic standouts and those awesome classics, many of which still driving or being displayed at auto shows and museums today.

Did you know they used to race electric cars back in the day, and they could compete well against the reciprocating cars of that time-period? The drivers preferred them, mostly due to noise issues, and because of reliability. Now then, what is a classic 1911 era electric car worth? Well, today they are priceless and if you had a working model, all original, it could easily fetch several thousand dollars. Indeed, I hope you will please consider all this and think on it.